Scott Bowden, Memphis Wrestling Manager & Historian, Passes Away

Apr 21, 2020 - by James Walsh

Memphis wrestling historian, writer and former USWA manager Scott Bowden passed away. The details of Bowden’s passing are not public but the news was announced by Kevin Lawler on Facebook who shared several photos of Scott.

Lawler and Bowden became friends at a young age and their friendship opened the door for Scott to get into the wrestling business. Bowden managed the likes of Eddie and Doug Gilbert, Jerry Lawler, Bam Bam Bigelow, The Dream Machine and Tommy Rich. Scott was also involved in an angle which led to him consistently wrestling Ms. Texas, now known as WWE Hall Of Famer Jacqueline Moore. Bowden did have interest in being a creative writer for WWE.

In 2007, Scott Bowden did an interview with the ‘Memphis Wrestling History’ website and in his own words, detailed how he got into professional wrestling:

“My dad is to blame. The earliest memory I have of wrestling is in the mid-’70s, with my dad forcing us to abandon our Saturday morning cartoons to switch the station on our only TV set to Memphis wrestling. I wanted Foghorn Leghorn but had to settle for Lance Russell. My sister and I always protested—quite loudly—to no avail. My dad wasn’t a huge mark or anything, but at that time the show attracted so many casual fans. Slowly, my curiosity developed a little more each time my dad turned the channel to the Memphis wrestling show. I recall seeing five or six wrestlers trying to restrain the Mongolian Stomper, and he tossed them around like they were sacks of garbage. Next to the Incredible Hulk, I thought Stomper had to be the toughest man alive. Jerry Lawler was really coming into his own as a personality around that time. The earliest I can remember actually liking wrestling was the summer of 1977, during the first series of Lawler versus Bill Dundee matches. That feud really captured my imagination. Every week, it was a different stipulation, along with the NWA Southern Title hanging in the balance. Crazy stipulations like Lawler and Dundee putting up their hair, thousands of dollars, their Cadillacs… culminating with Dundee’s wife getting her head shaved. Most of those bouts drew around 10,000 fans, so the area was red hot in the summer of ’77. I was six years old, and I was hooked. Years later, when I became a heel manager, I often referred to my rich daddy in Germantown. My dad was a lieutenant with the fire department at the time. The phone at the firehouse would be ringing off the hook every time I mentioned my rich daddy, with my dad’s friends and fellow firefighters ribbing him unmercifully. I can’t say for certain, but I believe my dad wishes he’d never turned that TV dial back in the ‘70s. Luckily, my dad has a great a sense of humor.”

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