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This Day In Wrestling History – February 7th‏



Trivia

1988 – Shiro Koshinaka wins the first NJPW Top of the Super Juniors tournament, defeating Hiroshi Hase in the final

2008 – WWE severs ties with it’s development territory OVW

Title Changes

1950 – Leroy McGuirk is forced to vacate the NWA Junior Heavyweight Title after being blinded in a car accident

1983 – Tola Yatsu defeats The Great Kabuki to win the WCCW Television Title

1984 – Dynamite Kid defeats The Cobra in a Triangular Series (having also beaten Davey Boy Smith) to win the vacant WWF Junior Heavyweight Title

1987 – Terry Taylor & Chris Adams defeat Rick Steiner & Sting in the final of a tournament to win the vacant UWF Tag Team Titles

1989 – Larry Zbyszko wins a Battle Royal, last eliminating Tom Zenk, to win the vacant AWA World Title

1992 – Money Inc. (Ted DiBiase & Irwin R Schyster) defeat The Legion of Doom (Hawk & Animal) to win the WWF Tag Team Titles. As a result, the Million Dollar Championship is abandoned

1994 – Jerry Lawler defeats Eddie Gilbert to win the USWA Unified World Heavyweight Title

1998 – Jushin Liger defeats Shinjiro Otani to win the IWGP Junior Heavyweight Title

2000 – on Nitro, Bam Bam Bigelow defeats Brian Knobbs to win the WCW Hardcore Title

Birthdays

Happy birthday to former WWF jobber Rusty Brooks (54) and 2-time AJPW Tag Team Champion Kim Duk (65)

In Memoriam

Today, in 1992, the wrestling world lost former WCW, NWA & WWF competitor ‘Mad Dog’ Buzz Sawyer aged just 32. Sawyer started his career wrestling for Georgia Championship Wrestling and Jim Crockett Promotions in the late 70’s. In these territories, Sawyer had a long and memorable feud with Tommy Rich, culminating in (what is credited to be) the first ever ‘enclosed cage’ match, or in other words, the equivalent of WWE’s Hell In A Cell match. He had a short WWF run in 1984, competing under Captain Lou Albano, but his ‘Bulldog’ gimmick failed to get over, and he left shortly afterwards. By 1986 he had passed through the Mid-Atlantic territory, winning their TV title, and had surfaced in WCCW, where he would have his most successful run. In 1989, he was released from the promotion after failing a drug test, though he had managed to win their Tag Team, Television and Heavyweight titles. His last major run was as part of Gary Hart’s J-Tex Corporation in WCW, where he feuded with Arn Anderson. However, he fractured his wrist at WrestleWar ’90 and would not return to WCW. Sawyer died of an overdose-related heart attack whilst still active on the indies. Interestingly, a young ‘wannabe’ wrestler named Mark Calaway approached Sawyer, asking Sawyer to train him to become a professional wrestler. After Calaway had paid Saywer, he taught the young man how to start a match, then skipped town the next day. Calaway would go on to appear in the WWF/E as The Undertaker


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One Response

  1. Joan B. in S. C. says:

    I can honestly say, as a child, I don’t know if I would have wanted to be ringside when Mad Dog Buzz Sawyer was around. He truly deserved the title Mad Dog. Oh, the good old days.

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